Tōtara Kumete

Tōtara Kumete

3,600 NZ

Ka ora ai te iwi

Kumete means food bowl. But the intricacy of this piece, carved from a recycled tōtara verandah post, has far more levels of complexity and depth of meaning than just a bowl, in the story it tells.

As a food bowl, a kumete symbolises plenty and abundance. Unlike any other you'll find, this kumete is shaped in the form of a poaka (pig), with its mouth as the pouring spout. This adds another level of symbolism - the richness and abundance of the meat.

On the joints of the pig are raperape, representing the energy and movement we have when we are well-fed in times of plenty.

This prestige piece from Tohunga Whakairo Michael Matchitt deserves pride of place - in a boardroom or reception area where its beauty and the skill of the work can be appreciated, and abundance can be invited.

73cm x 16cm x 17cm  2.4kg

1 NZ
Kauri Waka Hue

Kauri Waka Hue

720 NZ

That which we treasure

An exercise in the melding of traditional forms and concepts in a modern world brought Michael Matchitt to create the waka hue series. Traditionally, a waka huia was a repository for things precious - often huia feathers. A hue or gourd was also a storage receptacle.

This piece combines the form of a hue with the concept of a waka huia. The product is a stunningly beautiful contemporary work with much symbolism in that it can house your physical taonga (treasures) or metaphorically, your dreams and aspirations.

29.5cm x 14.5cm x 6.5cm  812g

Kauri Pātītī

Kauri Pātītī

720 NZ

Of whakapapa and collaboration

Inspired by an earlier collaboration with Blacksmith Rob Pinkney, Michael Matchitt has for a number of years created a series of pātītī or trade axes. The axe form has an obvious appeal as a weapon and tool, with its inherent power.

The pātītī also tells a story of whakapapa through its surface patterning and through the concept of the trade axe - an item of significant value that was traded between Māori and the early European settlers. 

When this piece is given as a gift, it takes on the whakapapa (history) of the recipient, and becomes a marker of power in their life journey.

29cm x 12.5cm x 1.5cm 430g

Tōtara Wheku

Tōtara Wheku

720 NZ

The waxing and waning of the moon

Inspired by American First Nations Moon Masks, Michael Matchitt set out to combine the traditional wheku form with the symbolism of the moon. Moon masks represent the four cycles of the moon, as well as the ebb and flow of the tides. The four paua discs allude to those cycles and the depth of meaning within.

A wheku represents something spiritual, intangible, and the phases of the moon in the maramataka (lunar calendar) identify times of new life and growth, as well as rest and dormancy. For you, this might represent a time of growth and replenishment, or the memory of a period of loss and mourning.

30cm x 19cm x 34mm 376g

Pūriri Turuturu

Pūriri Turuturu

680 NZ

Rarangatira

A turuturu is a weaving peg, and this exquisite piece is made from pūriri sourced in Whaingaroa (Raglan). Traditionally, 4 weaving pegs would be used while weaving a korowai (cloak). Korowai were once held in the highest esteem - so much so there are stories of a single korowai being traded for a waka taua (a war canoe).

In this sense, the wealth of an iwi or hapū or whānau could be seen to rest in the hands of the weaver - the kairaranga. This piece would be a fitting acknowledgement for a skilled weaver, or perhaps someone who is a rangatira - a leader - and provides for the wellbing of the whānau, hāpu, or iwi.

46cm x 42mm x 42mm 323g

1 NZ
Tōtara Tiki

Tōtara Tiki

650 NZ

To claim our rightful place

The clean and simple lines of this iconic tiki form make it both a timeless and contemporary piece.

Look closely to see the marks of the chisel that has been used to pare and smooth the surface of the recylced tōtara - Michael Matchitt is known for his traditional methods rather than the power tools and sandpaper used by so many carvers of today.

The tiki is the primordial human form, found in Māori and Pasifika cultures for thousands of years.

23cm x 13.5cm x 6cm 200g

1 NZ
Tōtara Parata

Tōtara Parata

560 NZ

Tradition and whakapapa

One of the most iconic carved forms in Māori culture, a parata is a carved human face. The mataora (facial tattoo) on this piece combines patterns traditionally used on the face with kowhaiwhai which could be seen as less traditional in this placement. All of these patterns represent whakapapa - genealogical lines.

This is an amazing entry-level piece for your indigenous art collection, and is perfect for overseas travel or shipping at less than 500grams. This is a classic and powerful Michael Matchitt work.

25cm x 15cm x 6cm 436g

1 NZ

1 NZ